Issue: Farmed Fish

Salmon swaps

30th Jan 20 by Christina O'Sullivan

Salmon is incredibly popular fish choice in the UK – purchases of salmon have risen by 550% over the last 50 years and a recent survey showed that salmon was voted people’s favourite fish to eat.

The salmon on your dinner plate is probably farmed, around 60% of the world’s salmon production is farmed, and in Scotland this figure reaches 100%, with the last commercial wild salmon fishery closing in late 2018. Farming salmon at an industrial scale requires large quantities of feed including wild caught fish. The current quantity of wild fish fed to farmed Scottish salmon, 460,000 tonnes, is roughly equivalent to the amount purchased by the entire UK population.

In February, we are asking you to swap salmon for something a bit different – turns out there is plenty more (interesting) fish in the sea.  Sign up here to receive recipes and ideas for what to eat and make sure to tag us and use the hashtag #SalmonSwaps to show us what you cook up.

Salmon swap supporters

 

 

The Sustainable Restaurant Association works to fast forward an environmentally restorative and socially progressive hospitality sector in the UK. Read their blog on farmed salmon.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Merlin- Labron Johnson is a Michelin star chef and created our ‘Eat like a fish’ event last year.

“Could herring or blue whiting, both currently a constituent of the fish oil in farmed salmon feed, be a future food for people? Could farmed mussels or seaweed provide some of the Omega-3 we currently get from fish? Or could we learn to make more from less, eating different parts of the fish and keeping farmed salmon as a rare luxury rather than a regular meal?”

 

 

 

 

 

Sustainable Fish Cities is an initiative conceived and supported by an alliance of not-for-profit organisations already working on sustainable seafood issues, coordinated by Sustain: The alliance for better food and farming.

 

 

Moshi Moshi, founded by Caroline Bennett, is a sushi restaurant in London. Caroline is at the forefront of campaigns to protect fish stocks, and has won a number of awards, including the prestigious Green Apple Award for the Environment, the RSPCA Award for Animal Welfare, and she was lauded as a 2009 international Seafood Champion by SeaWeb’s Seafood Choices. Moshi Moshi was one of the first five restaurants in the UK to achieve Marine Stewardship Council accreditation.

 

 

 

Caroline Rye, aka The Urban Fish Wife,  pursues her shared passions of seafood and storytelling in this inspirational city with a proud maritime history. Caroline’s ‘Neptune’s Bounty’ project aims to explore what seafood beyond ‘the big five’ that is salmon, cod, haddock, prawns and tuna.

What can you do next?
Instagram

Follow us on Instagram to see our work in action.

Follow us

Fishy business

16th Aug 18 by Christina O'Sullivan
What can you do next?
Salmon Swaps
How long does it take: 2 minutes

Make your fish supper more sustainable with our recipes and top tips

Get involved
New research

Read our report - Fishy Business: the Scottish salmon industry's hidden appetite for wild fish and land

Read now

Covid-19 appeal

Help us get good food to those who need it

Donate now