Archives: Research

Still Butchering The Planet

18th Mar 24 by Caela

The big-name financiers bankrolling livestock corporations and climate change – a 2024 update. In this report, we map global financial flows to the world’s 55 largest livestock corporations between 2015-2022 – and make the case for why banks and investors should stop financing these destructive and polluting companies.

Interested in digging deeper? Download the underlying dataset. We invite journalists, campaigners and activists to use this data to expose the flows of finance to big livestock companies – compiled through meticulous research by the Dutch not-for-profit Profundo from a range of financial databases, we’ve made this dataset public to help hold the financial backers of big livestock to account.

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Blue Empire

13th Feb 24 by Christina O'Sullivan

How the Norwegian salmon industry extracts nutrition and undermines livelihoods in West Africa

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Bankrolling the Butchers

29th Nov 23 by Christina O'Sullivan

The role of UK banks in financing industrial meat and dairy corporations. The UK’s ‘Big Six’ banks – Barclays, HSBC, Santander, Lloyds, NatWest, Standard Chartered – provided £62 billion in financing to the world’s largest meat, dairy and feed producers between 2015-2022.

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SETTING A TARGET THAT IS FIT FOR FOOD AND THE CLIMATE

24th Nov 23 by Christina O'Sullivan

New report by Feedback Europe finds that high EU biomethane target is unrealistic and unsustainable: as European reform of gas markets is underway, our analysis debunks the assumptions behind the high EU biomethane target and calls for a much lower target that is fit for food and the climate.

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Sugar Pollution – Curbing sugar supply for health and the environment

30th Oct 23 by Caela

UK supply of sugar is over 2.5 times the maximum safe limit for consumption. Feedback and Action on Sugar’s research reveals the harmful impacts on public health and the environment of producing, importing and consuming too much sugar in the UK. The report exposes how current agricultural and trade policies which support or aim to increase the UK’s supply of sugar undermine efforts to meet climate, environmental and public health goals.

You can view a summary of the report here.

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The 35 bcm biomethane target

20th Sep 23 by Christina O'Sullivan

Feedback EU’s analysis of the feedstock assumptions underlying the 35 billion cubic meter biomethane target shows that at best it will be simply impossible to reach this target. At worst, strong policy support for the target will lock in dangerously unsustainable agricultural, land use and energy practices.

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Greenwash Grocers – How UK supermarkets are greenwashing their climate impact by ignoring meat and dairy emissions

26th Jul 23 by Christina O'Sullivan

Our Supermarket Meat and Climate Scorecard Report 2023 finds that greenwash
is rife across the UK supermarket sector, and exposes the ways in which the 10 largest
supermarkets are ‘greenwashing’ their climate footprint.

 You can view how we scored the supermarkets here.

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Critical questions for alternative protein in the climate crisis

5th Jul 23 by Caela

Alternative proteins are on the rise. To get a clearer picture of what this could mean for current and future food systems, this discussion brief puts forth five critical questions for policymakers, producers, and retailers to consider on the role of alternative proteins in the dietary transition in Europe.

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Climate Misalignment – How Development Bank Investments in Industrial Livestock Are at Odds With Their Paris Agreement Commitments

30th Jun 23 by Christina O'Sullivan

To support the goals of the Paris Agreement—including “increasing the ability to adapt to the adverse impacts of climate change and foster climate resilience and low greenhouse gas emissions development, in a manner that does not threaten food production”—all public development banks must confront the necessity of reducing, not increasing, industrial livestock production

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A Rotten Business – How Barclays became the go-to bank for JBS, one of the world’s most destructive meat corporations

3rd May 23 by Christina O'Sullivan

Barclays bank, a household name in the UK with over 48 million customers worldwide, is the bank of choice for one of the world’s most destructive companies – the biggest global meat corporation, JBS. However, Barclays continues to provide billions of dollars’ worth of loans and underwriting services to JBS – the Brazilian meat giant infamous for its environmental and financial crimes.

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Sugar rush – How UK supermarkets drive high sugar sales

5th Apr 23 by Christina O'Sullivan

Feedback and Action on Sugar’s research reveals that nine out of ten UK supermarkets lack any policies to measure total sugar sales across all products and set reduction targets. Without reduction targets, supermarkets’ practices are resulting in an increase in total sugar sold. Supermarkets must commit to publicly disclosing and reducing overall sugar sales.

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Sustainability Disclosure Requirements & investment labels consultation paper

3rd Mar 23 by Christina O'Sullivan

Feedback’s response to the Financial Conduct Authority’s consultation.

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Statement on EU legally binding targets to reduce food waste

21st Nov 22 by

Feedback, alongside nearly 50 partner organisations, call on the European Commission, European Council, European Parliament and EU member states to support legally binding targets to reduce food waste from farm to fork by 2030, and for food waste measurement and targets to include edible food left unharvested or used on farm at primary production.

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No time to waste

20th Sep 22 by Christina O'Sullivan

We urge the European Commission to set a legally binding target of a 50%, farm-to-fork reduction in food waste by 2030 and recommend that policymakers, organisations, and individuals join us in calling for these targets to be adopted.

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Feedback response to DEFRA’s consultation on possible changes to public sector food and catering policy

2nd Sep 22 by
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Letter calling on IFC to cancel proposed $200 million loan to Brazilian agribusiness company Louis Dreyfus

1st Jun 22 by Christina O'Sullivan

We along with other organisations urge IFC shareholders not to grant the proposed loan of up to US$200 million to Louis Dreyfus Company Brazil (LDC) for the purchase of soy and corn produced in the heavily threatened Cerrado biome of Brazil, the world’s most biodiverse savanna that has already lost roughly half of its native vegetation to agribusiness.

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Reimagining a ‘win-win’ scenario

12th May 22 by Christina O'Sullivan

Surplus food redistribution (SFR) is hailed as a ‘win-win’ strategy to address both household food insecurity and food waste. However, SFR is condemned as being a ‘band-aid’ solution that addresses neither the fundamental socio-economic causes of poverty, nor the systematic roots of food waste. This research aims to set an agenda for the future of SFR in the UK for the next five to 10 years, including policy interventions required to achieve this future.

The future of SFR lies in a truly sustainable food system that meets the needs of the people and delivers socio-economic benefits whilst respecting planetary boundaries. In this future, SFR is no longer required as a solution for food waste or household food insecurity. Finally, the study identifies five pathways leading to this future: i) rejecting the SFR ‘win-win’ narrative ii) tackling systematic food overproduction iii) eradicating poverty iv) delivering food security within planetary boundaries, and v) balancing uneven power distribution amongst food system actors. The proposed interventions are relevant to food and waste policies, and offer insights to transition pathways for sustainable food and other socio-technical systems.

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World’s largest meat company, JBS, increases emissions by 51% in five years despite 2040 net zero climate target, continues to greenwash its huge climate footprint

27th Apr 22 by Christina O'Sullivan

October 2022 Update: Joint Statement by IATP, Feedback and DeSmog on JBS’ response to our research published in April 2022 on its GHG emissions 

JBS, which is the largest meat processor in the world, increased its annual greenhouse gas emissions by a whopping 51% between 2016 and 2021, from 280 million metric tonnes to 421.6 million metric tonnes (mmts), based on the Institute for Agriculture and Trade Policy (IATP)’s latest calculations.[1]

This is more than fossil fuel giant Total’s 2020 emissions.[2] It is more than Italy’s annual climate footprint and 95% of France’s (at 443 mmt). As JBS prepares for its annual general meeting (AGM) on 22 April in São Paulo, this briefing outlines how the company’s “green” claims fail to live up to reality and the meat giant continues to mislead in its communications with investors and the public.

[1] Using the UN Food and Agriculture Organization’s GLEAM model, GRAIN and IATP calculated JBS’s 2016 emissions in Emissions Impossible 2018. IATP has used the same methodology to update the company’s 2021 emissions. See Dataset here.

[2] Total Energies emissions 2020: 417 MtCO2e; Richard Heede, Climate Accountability Institute, personal communication, 9 April 2022. See also, our Dataset, “Comparisons” worksheet comparing JBS’s emissions with that of other carbon majors and countries.

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EU food supply and solidarity response to the war in Ukraine

16th Mar 22 by Christina O'Sullivan

“Both the COVID-19 pandemic and the war in Ukraine have shed light on the weaknesses of the
European food system.”

Read our joint letter on EU food supply and solidarity response to the war in Ukraine.

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recommendations for UK policymakers

9th Mar 22 by Christina O'Sullivan

A policy brief outlining recommendations for UK policymakers based on the results of FLAVOUR, an innovative project funded by the EU’s Interreg 2 Seas Mers Zeeën 2014-2020 programme that aims to tackle food waste while supporting inclusive jobs in the social economy.

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Maximising sustainable nutrient production from coupled fisheries-aquaculture systems

2nd Mar 22 by Christina O'Sullivan

Our research reveals that eating the wild-caught fish destined for salmon farms would allow nearly 4 million tonnes of fish to be left in the sea while providing an extra 6 million tonnes of seafood.

 

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Climate mitigation efficacy of anaerobic digestion in a decarbonising economy

21st Feb 22 by Christina O'Sullivan

Anaerobic digestion (AD) – the process of producing “biogas” from organic matter like crops and wastes – has presented itself as the silver bullet to everything from producing green gas for heating and transport, to producing fertiliser for our crops. However, our research shows that, at best, AD is a sub-optimal sticking plaster solution, and at worst, it is sometimes actually perpetuating the problems it claims to solve.

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A model for a sustainable food system

26th Jan 22 by Christina O'Sullivan

Our vision for the food system is of a circular food system, one which gobbles fewer resources to produce food, and loses far less food in the form of waste.

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A New Front in Divestment Campaigning

19th Jan 22 by Christina O'Sullivan

The UK’s local councils are pouring £238 million in pension fund money into industrial livestock investments, fuelling a destructive industry which causes climate change, deforestation, human rights abuses and industrial-scale animal cruelty.

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